Strange moans, haunted noises and high-pitched screeches! Months ago, these creepy sounds were among the first recording taken by scientists at the deepest point of the Earth's surface at the bottom of the Mariana Trench. The sounds were haunting and made many think of the dark world that probably lurked right under the Pacific ocean.

 

While one couldn't really get to the deepest point, a titanium-encased hydrophone was dropped down there that recorded sounds for 23 days. Ever since then, there has been a lot of talk about a creepy audio recording that lasted about 3.5 seconds termed as an alien call.

 

While wanting to believe that aliens thrive in there and are waiting with an army to attack the human race, and we could be up for a movie-like fight sounds very interesting. However, the mystery has been resolved! And, while the conspiracy theories continues, lets us disappoint you by saying - there are no aliens, but the 'alien call' came from a dwarf minke whale. It is touted to be a new type of baleen whale call.

 

The new findings have been published in the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America who explained the sound is similar to the one created by dwarf minke whales and these whales are a type of baleen whales capable of producing regionally-specific calls. Scientists at OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center have named the sound “Western Pacific Biotwang.”

 

Sharon Nieukirk, senior faculty research assistant in marine bioacoustics at Oregon State said, “The low-frequency moaning part is typical of baleen whales, and it’s that kind of twangy sound that makes it really unique. We don’t find many new baleen whale calls.”

 

Minke whales are said to be the smallest species of baleen whales, however, nothing much is known about them as they are not seen at the surface. Researchers are now looking to study more about these whales.

 

Nieukirk has said that the Western Pacific Biotwang has similarities to the Star Wars call due to its complexities so it is reasonable to believe the sound was by the minke, but there are still doubts. The researchers plan to study the sound further.

 

Image source: NOAA