According to the South Indian Flower Growers Association, out of a total of 75 lakh flowers over 40 lakh, Bengaluru roses were sold in the United Kingdom, Australia,  Japan, New Zealand, Malaysia, Gulf and Singapore, besides other countries. 

 

Bengaluru may have witnessed ecological imbalance, but still, it has a potential to grow quality flowers. Bengaluru being 900 feet about the sea level is a perfect location for growing roses, especially the 'Dutch' variety. 


The roses are grown in over 400 hectors of land in and around Bengaluru. 


"Places like Hoskote, Doddabalapur, Nelmangala, Anekal and Mulbagal, which are in 60 to 70 km radius have witnessed a good yield despite many other crops failing. As the roses were grown in poly-house, the farmers can hope for good income. 


" About 30,000 plants can be accommodated in one acre of land. As the plant matures in six months, the growers can expect a yield of 3000 to 4000 stemmed roses during peak season. After five years, new plants have to be planted," said Dr Jayaprakash, General  Secretary, South Indian Flower Growers Association  


The flowers are of such fine quality that Japan prefers importing the 'Dutch' variety of red roses only from Bengaluru. 

 

Countries such as United Kingdom, Australia,  Japan, New Zeland, Malaysia, Gulf and Singapore prefer to imports from Bengaluru City.
 

A bunch of stemmed roses are sold for Rs 200 during the peak time between February 7 to 14. Each bunch contains 20 roses. From here small time buyers take and sell it for higher rates, said Sridhar Babu Reddy Patil Manager, Member Bengaluru Florist Association.
 

The flowers that are supplied from farmland are marketed through International Flower Auction Bengaluru Limited (IFABL). The flowers are stored in 2 to 4 degrees Celsius in cold storage house at IFABL  to ensure its freshness and longevity," said  Nagaraj, Deputy Director, Horticulture Department and in-charge, IFABL.