NEET: Vellore's Christian Medical College leaves 99 of its 100 seats empty

First Published 7, Sep 2017, 6:41 PM IST
Christian Medical College leaves 99 of its 100 seats empty
Highlights
  • The premier Christian Medical College in Tamil Nadu's Vellore has decided to leave 99 of its 100 MBBS seats vacant this year
  • Allegedly the institution is unable to follow its established admission process after the NEET became operational
  • The one student admitted to the college this year was the son of a soldier who was nominated by the centre for MBBS

The premier Christian Medical College in Tamil Nadu's Vellore has decided to leave 99 of its 100 MBBS seats vacant this year, reports NDTV.

Allegedly the institution is unable to follow its established admission process after the NEET became operational.

As opposed to the present system where committees set up by the Central and State governments select students through centralized counseling, the century old minority institute is seeking rights to select National Eligibility cum Entrance Test (NEET) qualified students through its own counselling.

The one student admitted to the college this year was the son of a soldier who was nominated by the centre for MBBS.

It has another nominee for a super specialty programme which has 62 seats.

As a result 99 seats in MBBS and 61 in the super specialities will not be filled.

"We select students from all over the country with exceptional social concern, to serve and help and who have demonstrated empathy. Many students we choose are from poor background in remote areas and they go back and serve in those areas. High marks alone don't guarantee willingness to serve. We accept NEET. As a minority institution we believe we have the right to choose among qualified candidates fulfilling our vision," said Dr Anna Pulimood, the Principal to NDTV.

Last year, the Supreme Court had exempted the college and allowed it to conduct admissions on its own.

The news comes in the wake of the S Anitha suicide case, where a Dalit girl from Tamil Nadu who had previously moved to the Supreme Court to protest against NEET had killed herself after failing to secure a medical seat through NEET.

The college says it caters to 180 mission hospitals in rural and remote areas across the country where on completion of the course, doctors are required to serve for two years on low salary.

The college authorities say the top court is likely to give its verdict in October and if the court permits the remaining seats would be filled.

However, the Doctors Association for Social Equality says CMC's action may not be the right option. Dr GR Rabindranath, General Secretary says, "As a developing country, we need more UG doctors and super specialty doctors also. At this juncture stopping admissions to these courses is a great loss to the health care delivery system of India."

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