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Eid-ul-Adha: All about the festival and how it will be different this year

The day is significant for Muslims as it commemorates the sacrifice of Prophet Ibrahim, who willingly agreed to kill his son at God's behest. 

Festival Eid-ul-Adha All about the festival and how it will be different this year
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New Delhi, First Published Jul 20, 2021, 3:09 PM IST
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Eid-ul-Zuha, also known as Bakra-Id or Bakrid in India, will be celebrated this year on July 21. The word 'Eid' is derived from Arabic, which means 'festival', and 'Zuha' suggests 'sacrifice'. The day is significant for Muslims as it commemorates the sacrifice of Prophet Ibrahim, who willingly agreed to kill his son at God's behest. 

Muslims visit mosques to offer prayer or namaz for peace and prosperity. In the present day, animals, typically goats, lambs or cows, are still sacrificed to mark the occasion.

Usually, Muslims would visit mosques and have large community gatherings. However, this time around too, as was the case last year, celebrations will be a bit different. 

Here is what to know about the festival:

History and Significance

The history dates back to when Prophet Ibrahim saw Allah in his dream, asking him to sacrifice his son, Issac, when an angel appeared and stopped him. She told Prophet that God was convinced of his love for him and hence, he should never sacrifice a human life. 

This story was first mentioned in Hebrew Bible, which was written around the 8th to 1st century BCE. Ibrahim is believed to be an ancestor of Prophet Muhammad. This festival also marks the end of the annual Hajj pilgrimage to the holy town of Mecca. The celebrations include getting together, feasting, charity and giving gifts to each other.

When is Eid celebrated?

As per the Islamic Lunar calendar, it is observed on the 10th day of Dhu al-Hijjah, and the dates depend on the sighting of the moon. 

How will Eid al-Adha be celebrated this year? 

Celebrations normally include spending time with friends and family, wearing new attire and giving gifts. There are big communal religious ceremonies or services, which include a prayer and a sermon. 

However, due to ongoing COVID-19, there will be exceptions. 

In Delhi, there will be no mass prayers at the Jama Masjid on the eve, and religious leaders appealed have to the community members to follow the protocols.

The Maharashtra government has asked Muslims to celebrate Bakrid at home only since religious places have been shut down owing to restrictions. 

As COVID cases are declining, the Tamil Nadu government has allowed places of worship to function but has not permitted mass prayers or consecrations.

The state government of Karnataka also issued new guidelines for Bakrid celebrations, and only 50 people are allowed inside the Mosque where people will have to maintain a distance of 6 feet between them.

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