Twitter apologises for Ladakh blunder: Report

First Published 29, Oct 2020, 1:41 PM

A day after a parliamentary panel read the riot act to Twitter over the Ladakh geo-tagging blunder the micro-blogging site has tendered an apology.
 

<p>A day after a joint parliamentary panel read the riot act to Twitter over the Ladakh geo-tagging blunder the micro-blogging site has tendered an apology.</p>

<p>According to news agency ANI, Twitter tendered a verbal apology before the joint parliamentary committee.</p>

A day after a joint parliamentary panel read the riot act to Twitter over the Ladakh geo-tagging blunder the micro-blogging site has tendered an apology.

According to news agency ANI, Twitter tendered a verbal apology before the joint parliamentary committee.

<p>Twitter India officials were grilled and taken to task by lawmakers over the micro-blogging site's misrepresentation of Ladakh that showed it as part of China.</p>

<p>Appearing before the joint parliamentary committee examining the data protection bill, Twitter officials were allegedly confronted by MPs from the Congress, Trinamool Congress and the Biju Janata Dal.</p>

Twitter India officials were grilled and taken to task by lawmakers over the micro-blogging site's misrepresentation of Ladakh that showed it as part of China.

Appearing before the joint parliamentary committee examining the data protection bill, Twitter officials were allegedly confronted by MPs from the Congress, Trinamool Congress and the Biju Janata Dal.

<p>The officials were told that the explaination given by the company as that of a geo-tagging error was grossly inadequate because misrepresentation of this nature is a criminal offence that carries a punishment for 7 years.</p>

<p>According to a report in India Today, Twitter was also told to differentiate between sensitivity and compliance with the Indian law. The JPC has sought a written explanation from Twitter since junior employees appeared before the panel during its hearing.</p>

The officials were told that the explaination given by the company as that of a geo-tagging error was grossly inadequate because misrepresentation of this nature is a criminal offence that carries a punishment for 7 years.

According to a report in India Today, Twitter was also told to differentiate between sensitivity and compliance with the Indian law. The JPC has sought a written explanation from Twitter since junior employees appeared before the panel during its hearing.

<p>Panel Chairman Meenakshi Lekhi later told media persons, "This (Twitter explanation) is inadequate. It is not just a question of sensitivity. It is against the sovereignty and integrity of India."</p>

<p>The Narendra Modi government had last week written a stern letter to Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey conveying its strong disapproval over misrepresentation of map of India.</p>

Panel Chairman Meenakshi Lekhi later told media persons, "This (Twitter explanation) is inadequate. It is not just a question of sensitivity. It is against the sovereignty and integrity of India."

The Narendra Modi government had last week written a stern letter to Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey conveying its strong disapproval over misrepresentation of map of India.

<p>In the letter, Twitter was reminded that Leh is headquarter of Union Territory of Ladakh and both Ladakh as well as Jammu and Kashmir are integral and inalienable parts of India governed by the Constitution of India.</p>

<p>The warning to Twitter came after the social media platform landed itself in controversy after users shared screenshots of its blunder, which was first pointed out by National Security Analyst Nitin A Gokhale.</p>

<p>A Twitter spokesperson had then called it a technical issue, one which they said has been swiftly resolved.</p>

In the letter, Twitter was reminded that Leh is headquarter of Union Territory of Ladakh and both Ladakh as well as Jammu and Kashmir are integral and inalienable parts of India governed by the Constitution of India.

The warning to Twitter came after the social media platform landed itself in controversy after users shared screenshots of its blunder, which was first pointed out by National Security Analyst Nitin A Gokhale.

A Twitter spokesperson had then called it a technical issue, one which they said has been swiftly resolved.

loader