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Here's what G20 leaders final statement on climate stated; Details inside

The G20 Group, which includes Brazil, China, India, Germany, and the United States, is responsible for 80% of worldwide greenhouse gas emissions.

Heres what G20 leaders final statement on climate stated Details inside gcw
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New Delhi, First Published Oct 31, 2021, 7:12 PM IST
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Leaders of the Group of 20 major countries on Sunday reached an agreement on a final statement that calls for "meaningful and effective" action to keep global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius but gives few actual pledges. The outcome of days of harsh negotiating among diplomats leaves a massive amount of work to be done at a more significant United Nations climate meeting in Scotland. The G20 Group, which includes Brazil, China, India, Germany, and the United States, is responsible for 80% of worldwide greenhouse gas emissions.

According to the final agreement, present national strategies for reducing emissions must be enhanced "if required" and makes no particular mention of 2050 as a target date for achieving net-zero carbon emissions. "We acknowledge that the effects of climate change at 1.5°C are significantly lesser than at 2°C. Maintaining 1.5°C would need significant and effective initiatives and commitment from all countries," according to the communiqué.

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The 1.5C barrier is what UN scientists say must be fulfilled to avoid a significant acceleration of catastrophic climate events, including droughts, cyclones, and floods. To accomplish it, they advocate achieving net zero emissions by 2050. The leaders acknowledged the "critical importance" of attaining net-zero carbon emissions by the middle of this century. China, the world's largest carbon emitter, has set a goal date of 2060, and other major polluters such as India and Russia have also stated that they would not adhere to the 2050 target date.

According to UN scientists, even if current national plans are wholly followed, the globe would experience 2.7 degrees of global warming, resulting in a catastrophic acceleration of catastrophes such as drought, storms, and flooding. The proposal pledges to stop supporting foreign coal-fired power generation by the end of this year. Still, it does not provide a timeline for phasing out coal power, just committing to do so "as soon as practicable."

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They also gave no timetable for phasing out fossil fuel subsidies, stating they will try to do so "in the medium term." They diluted their primary draught language on methane, which has a more significant but shorter-term impact on global warming than carbon dioxide.

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