Yes, you read that right, Baghdadi is helping security agencies track down Islamic State (ISIS) supporters. Well, it is not ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, but an Arab Spring activist Iyad El-Baghadi.


In past several months Iyad el-Baghdadi has been contacted by several people who wanted to join the Islamic State terrorist group as they confused his name with the ISIS leader.

 

According to an Indian Express report, even Indian security agencies are now trying to get information on certain Indian nationals, who have contacted Iyad asking him how to join the ISIS. Iyad reportedly has received a flood of emails from India expressing their interest in ISIS and asking his help to reach the 'Caliphate.'

 

In a tweet on Tuesday evening, Iyad, a Palestine-born UAE citizen who has been living in Norway after he sought asylum, asked how he could get in touch with Indian authorities to report these people.

 

“If I get emails from India-based accounts asking how to join ISIS, who in India do I report them to?” Iyad tweeted.

In another tweet, he said that he had already reported the matter to the email host, but was yet to get in touch with Indian authorities. “Already contacted the email host and reported. I want to know the security agency to report to as well, just in case,” he tweeted.

 

The intelligence agencies now reportedly trying to get in touch with Iyad. A Twitter handle of the Mumbai police also responded to Iyad, saying, “Thank you for bringing it to our notice. We will look into it.”

 

Troubles came knocking at Iyad el-Baghdadi's door back in January this year after a Russian media outlet mistakenly reported that Iyad as the ISIS leader - Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. Soon after this even Twitter briefly blocked him, before realising the mistake.

 

Following the controversy, the Arab Spring activist in a bid to distance himself from the controversy in an edit-piece for International Business Times wrote:

"ISIS, in stark contrast, wants to impose a brutal "unity" through enforced uniformity, informed by a dismal black-or-white world view. It is an overtly sectarian state that unapologetically oppresses minorities, and even other Muslims. It sees individuals as dispensable and tramples their rights in the name of the collective – much like many of the old regimes do. It does not want to end tyranny – it only wishes to forcibly impose one with a religious mandate."

 A rather funny image posted by Iyad back in January after he was mistaken to be ISIS leader Abu Bakr al Baghdadi