Asianet NewsableAsianet Newsable

T20 WC 2024: Have South Africa finally shed 'chokers' tag? Shamsi lauds 'new Proteas' team after win over WI

South Africa, long branded as "chokers," have seen a transformation with wrist spinner Tabraiz Shamsi expressing joy over the "new Proteas" overcoming tight situations at the ongoing T20 World Cup 2024.

T20 WC 2024: Have South Africa finally shed 'chokers' tag? Shamsi lauds 'new Proteas' team after win over WI snt
Author
First Published Jun 24, 2024, 6:28 PM IST

South Africa, long branded as "chokers," have seen a transformation with wrist spinner Tabraiz Shamsi expressing joy over the "new Proteas" overcoming tight situations at the ongoing T20 World Cup 2024.

Led by Aiden Markram, the team remains undefeated, triumphing in closely contested matches. They clinched victories by narrow margins: 1 run against Nepal, 4 runs versus Bangladesh, and 7 runs against England.

In their latest test, South Africa maintained their cool to defeat hosts West Indies by three wickets on Sunday, securing a spot in the semifinals.

"Obviously most of the games have been a lot closer than we would have personally liked, but the amazing thing is that this new Proteas team always seems to get over the line," Shamsi said at the post-match conference.

"We've been put under huge pressure basically in every single game that we've played and the boys have managed to find a way to win no matter what the situation is, no matter how close the game is. So that's really pleasing for us as a unit, and it's sort of like in a funny way we're looking forward to it," he added.

After facing criticism following a tough outing against USA, Shamsi, 34, redeemed himself as a key figure in South Africa's victory over West Indies, delivering impressive figures of 3/27.

"It's a double-edged sword right - the previous game I bowled later in the innings and I went for 50 and there was certain critics coming out from the wood works, speaking about pressure and how I can't handle pressure and so to speak - I think in a quarterfinal match I hope that was enough pressure for me to respond to," the South African said.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by ICC (@icc)

Shamsi understands that there will be occasions when he won't perform at his peak.

"It's just a little bit ridiculous when it's ex-players - when they're on the field they did the same things now we're trying our best so what that's part of the game right we got to go out there and do our job. It doesn't really matter where I'm asked to bowl, whether it's early on in the innings or at the back end. There's a specific job that I've got to do. And we've all played enough cricket to understand that sometimes it will work, on other days it wouldn't, and somebody else will cover for you, and vice versa," he said.

"That's the mentality that we have within the squad. Whoever's day it is needs to take extra load and cover up for someone that's maybe not having a good game and that's perfectly normal, that's cricket," Shamsi added.

Having competed in the Caribbean Premier League, Shamsi gained valuable insights into the workings of West Indies players, which aided the spinner in strategizing their downfall in what amounted to a virtual quarterfinal.

"Fortunately, I've been able to play CPL for the last five or six years. And one thing with the West Indian boys, you don't have to guess what their intent is going to be. So, it sort of helps you formulate a plan," he concluded.

Latest Videos
Follow Us:
Download App:
  • android
  • ios