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Taliban urges United States not to 'destabilise' their rule in Afghanistan

Muttaqi's comments come as the Taliban attempts to re-establish its authority in Afghanistan, 20 years after the US-led invasion, pushed the hardline Islamists out.

Taliban urges United States not to 'destabilise' their rule in Afghanistan gcw
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Kabul, First Published Oct 10, 2021, 12:31 PM IST
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During their first face-to-face meetings since the US pullout, the Taliban urged the US not to "destabilise" the rule, according to Amir Khan Muttaqi, the Taliban's foreign minister. Muttaqi's comments come as the Taliban attempts to re-establish its authority in Afghanistan, 20 years after the US-led invasion, pushed the hardline Islamists out. Speaking to the media, Muttaqi said that they clearly warned them that attempting to destabilise the Afghan government is bad for no one.

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"Everyone benefits from strong relations with Afghanistan. Nothing should be done to destabilise Afghanistan's current administration, which might cause issues for the people," he added in an AFP-translated taped remark. Muttaqi's comments came on the first two days of discussions with a US delegation led by State Department Deputy Special Representative Tom West and top USAID humanitarian officer Sarah Charles. He also stated that the US would assist in vaccinating Afghans against Covid-19. The US side had no quick reaction to the negotiations. He added that the delegation from the United States determined that they would work with us on vaccination and human cooperation.

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He went on to say that it is assumed that states would maintain good relations with one another while Afghanistan is going through a difficult period so that Afghanistan will emerge stronger. In August, the hardline Taliban reclaimed control as the US concluded its two-decade involvement in Afghanistan with a chaotic evacuation of foreign citizens and Afghans.
Their efforts to cement their control have been hampered by a succession of assaults by the Islamic State-Khorasan (IS-K), which claimed responsibility for a blast at a Shiite mosque on Friday that killed more than 60 people. Afghanistan's economy is likewise on the verge of implosion, with international help cut off, food prices increasing, and unemployment skyrocketing.

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