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YouTube removes 'dislike' counts on clips to curb online harassment

In a statement, YouTube said to guarantee that YouTube supports polite interactions between viewers and creators, they experimented with the dislike button to see whether modifications may help better protect our artists from harassment and minimise dislike assaults.

YouTube removes dislike counts on clips to curb online harassment gcw
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New Delhi, First Published Nov 11, 2021, 4:20 PM IST
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To protect artists from abuse and targeted attacks, YouTube said on Wednesday that the number of "dislike" clicks on videos would no longer be available to the public. A public tally of likes - or dislikes - that social media posts receive is frequently highlighted as deleterious to well-being by critics, and both Facebook and Instagram have enabled users to opt-out. Users of Google's video-sharing site will still be able to hit the "dislike" button. They will no longer see the negative review count if they click the button underneath a clip.

In a statement, YouTube said to guarantee that YouTube supports polite interactions between viewers and creators, they experimented with the dislike button to see whether modifications may help better protect our artists from harassment and minimise dislike assaults. Content creators, or social media stars that draw large crowds online, will be able to monitor how many thumbs-down marks their videos receive. YouTube revealed that smaller-scale or new artists were unfairly targeted in assaults, in which users try to increase the number of dislikes on videos. The improvements at YouTube come as politicians, regulators, and watchdogs often criticise extensive social networks and video platforms for not doing enough to combat online abuse.

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Facebook is facing one of its most catastrophic reputational problems in history, thanks to leaked internal papers revealing that executives were aware of the potential harm of its services. The disclosures from former Facebook employee Frances Haugen's leaks have given new momentum to calls for Big Tech corporations to be regulated. Concerns about Facebook's potential harm have spread to other platforms, with TikTok, Snapchat, and YouTube attempting to persuade US senators in a hearing last month that their services were safe for their young users.

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